Hacker

Lone-Operator Cyberterrorism

Abstract:

This paper describes lone-operator cyberterrorism, a topic that is nearly absent in the literature. The paper will present a working definition of the base terms—terrorism, lone operator, and cyberterrorism—in order to start the conversation, and will compare and contrast the motivation, expectations, and characteristics of the lone-operator terrorist and lone-operator cyberterrorist.

A New Avenue of Attack: Event-driven System Vulnerabilities

ABSTRACT

Hacker Warfare is the type of Information Warfare that involves the inflicting of damage to the digital infrastructure of the enemy by exploiting security vulnerabilities. In this paper we discuss for the first time the exploitation of event-driven systems in order to inflict this type of damage. As an attacker may use command line parameters and network data to exploit security vulnerabilities in local and network applications respectively, he can use events against event-driven applications.

Sizing the Opportunity for Opportunistic Cybercriminals

ABSTRACT

According to Graboske, et al ‘the fundamental principle of criminology is that crime follows opportunity, and the opportunities for theft abound in the Digital Age’. But what is the extent of this opportunity? There are numerous hacker toolkits readily available from the Internet that exploits security weaknesses in target systems. This paper presents the results of a 11⁄2- year survey of websites that tested for such weaknesses. The author examined popular ‘hacker’ toolkits and assembled a data collection toolkit that tested for 70 exploits. Whilst some 2 million websites were targeted across the 57 most populous domains, 748,000 are reported. Of these, 77% displayed susceptibility to at least one exploit. Whilst this indicates significant opportunity, it also demonstrates the lack of capable guardianship by system owners and those tasked with protecting cyberspace. The facts that ISPs’ fail to collect identification details and allows bulk system scanning are factors that facilitate the commission of cybercrime.

Catch Me If You Can: Cyber Anonymity

ABSTRACT

Advances in network security and litigation have empowered and enabled corporations to conduct Internet and desktop surveillance on their employees and customers, while Governments have spent billions to monitor cyberspace to include entering agreements with corporations to provide surveillance data on adversarial groups, competitors, and citizenry (Reuters, 2010).  Although the initial intent of network and Internet monitoring may be honourable; terrorists, hackers, and cyber-criminals already have access to the necessary tools and methodologies to continue in their activities unabated.  This paper will demonstrate a step-by-step case study using a ‘paranoid’ approach to remaining anonymous using only open-source tools.

Journal of Information Warfare

The definitive publication for the best and latest research and analysis on information warfare, information operations, and cyber crime. Available in traditional hard copy or online.

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The definitive publication for the best and latest research and analysis on information warfare, information operations, and cyber crime. Available in traditional hard copy or online.

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