National Security Policy

A Tale of Two Cities: Approaches to Counter-Terrorism and Critical Infrastructure Protection in Washington, DC and Canberra

ABSTRACT

All nations undertake a variety of activities to protect their citizens from the threat posed by terrorism. In the last decade, the requirements of effective counter- terrorism (CT) policy have become more demanding as the result of the changing nature of global terrorism, and the challenges posed by the requirement to protect vulnerable critical national infrastructures (CNI). (Since the events of 11 September 2001, of these policies has taken on an unprecedented importance.) But the approaches taken by different nations regarding national CT and critical infrastructure protection (CIP) policies have varied considerably. In this paper, the authors will examine the approaches to CT and CIP policies adopted by two nations – the United States and Australia – both before and after 11 September 2001. The paper concludes by proposing explanations for the different approaches in CT and CIP policies adopted by the United States and Australia.

Asymmetrical Adversarialism in National Defense Policy, The Marketplace and Personal Privacy

ABSTRACT

I once calculated, on the back of a napkin thoroughly drenched in Outback steak juice, that it takes a whole lot of paper to wage a war. I mean, a terrific amount of paper: something like 3,412.7 pieces of papers for every combatant and support soldier in the chain of command. If the war or Operation Other Than War (OOW) or a peace keeping mission carries on for more than six weeks, the paperwork jungle doubles and as the war continues into months, the paperwork increases, but at a lesser rate of bureaucratic indulgence

All of this war-fighting paper means there has to be a whole lot of paper pushers to push the paper needed to fight the war. To support the paper pushers, you have to have people to buy the paper and the pens at the right price; a price that the government would be proud to pay as long as they’re fighting a war. And of course, you have to have bean counters to count how much paper the paper pushers are pushing which is what really makes the whole war business worth doing in the first place. You see, war is a lot about paper.

The Weakest Link : The ICT Supply Chain and Information Warfare

ABSTRACT

This paper proposes a unified model of best practice for ICT Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM). Ensuring proper ICT-SCRM practice is an important national priority because of the vulnerability of current supply chains to attack by nation states and other adversaries. This paper presents a comprehensive set of standards-based lifecycle practices designed to address ICT product integrity concerns in the global marketplace.

Journal of Information Warfare

The definitive publication for the best and latest research and analysis on information warfare, information operations, and cyber crime. Available in traditional hard copy or online.

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The definitive publication for the best and latest research and analysis on information warfare, information operations, and cyber crime. Available in traditional hard copy or online.

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