Volume 9, Issue 3 Editorial

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December, 2010

Welcome to the third issue of JIW for 2010 and the 27th issue overall. The Journal of Information Warfare continues to engage in the ever widening discipline of information warfare / operations. In particular, this issue puts forward a range of papers that push the information warfare envelope in several new directions. The impact of influence can now be seen through a variety of lenses, and although we contest these differences as we search to define and distinguish our efforts, we must continue to acknowledge the wide-ranging scope of information warfare.

The issue has 5 papers. The paper by van Vuuren, Phahlamohlaka and Brazzoli examines a range of impending security threats from increased internet usage and broadband development. The paper considers broadband access augmentation for average citizens in the South African context and suggests multiple long-term mitigation strategies.

The paper by Hutchinson reflects on the question of whether new technologies initiate or just communicate radical ideas and behaviors. It focuses on the burning question of just how influential new media is in its own right. Hutchinson speculates on whether the factors that lead to behavioral extremes still retain a dependency on other additional factors, or whether they can produce militant actions on their own.

The third paper by Brown, Yuan, Johnson and Lutz looks at covert channels on the Internet. The paper uses a set of common characteristics as a starting point, and then categorizes and evaluates known and new covert channels. The authors point to a range of beneficial applications for covert channels including the detection and mitigation of Man in the Middle attacks.

The fourth paper by Allen and Gilbert puts up the notion of a new domain for the purposes of defense and security. In putting forward their suggestion of an “Information Sphere”, the authors Allen and Gilbert consider the functions and criteria by which the need for a new domain is worthy of consideration.

The final paper by Zhanshan Ma draws a novel comparison between Zahavi’s 1975 Handicap Principle and the notion of asymmetry in information warfare. The notion that animal communication networks can be considered as nature’s version of information warfare rounds out an eclectic issue of the Journal of Information Warfare, and one that pushes the “boundaries of influence” in several different directions.

David Cook
Coordinating Editor
d.cook@ecu.edu.au


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Journal of Information Warfare

The definitive publication for the best and latest research and analysis on information warfare, information operations, and cyber crime. Available in traditional hard copy or online.

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